Fucked

On that evening, the soldiers leading the convoy refused to let Skoug drive his own vehicle back to Heet without night-vision goggles. So a soldier took Skoug’s car, and Skoug was forced to be a passenger in a military vehicle. “We start out the front gate, and I find out that the truck that I was in was the frickin’ lead truck,” he recalls. “And I’m going, ‘Oh, great.’ ”

The bomb went off about a half-hour later, ripping through the truck floor and destroying four inches of Skoug’s left femur. “The windshield looked like there was a film on it,” he says. “I find out later it was a film — it was blood and meat and stuff all over the windshield on the inside.” Skoug was loaded into the back of a Humvee, his legs hanging out, and evacuated to an Army hospital in Germany before being airlifted back to the States.

When Skoug arrived, it was his wife, Linda, who had to handle all his affairs. She was the one who arranged for an air ambulance to take him to Houston, where she had persuaded an orthopedic hospital to admit him as a patient. She had to do this because almost right from the start, Wolfpack washed its hands of Russell Skoug. The insurance policy he had been given turned out to be useless — the company denied all coverage, beginning with a $72,597 bill for his stay in the German hospital. Despite assurances from Wolfpack chief Mark Atwood that he would cover all Skoug’s expenses, neither he nor the insurance company would pay for the $16,000 trip in the air ambulance. Nobody paid for the operations Skoug had in Houston — as many as three a day, every day for a month. And nobody paid for his subsequent rehab stint in another Houston hospital — despite the fact that military law requires every company contracting with the government to fully insure all of its employees in the war zone.

Now that he’s out, sitting at home on his couch with only partial use of his left hand and left leg, Skoug has a stack of unpaid medical bills almost three inches tall. As he speaks, he keeps fidgeting. He apologizes, explaining that he can’t sit still for very long. Why? Because Skoug can no longer afford pain medication. “I take ibuprofen sometimes,” he says, “but basically I just grin and bear it.”

And here’s where this story turns into something perfectly symbolic of everything that the war in Iraq stands for, a window into the soul of for-profit contractors who not only left behind a breathtaking legacy of fraud, waste and corruption but, through their calculating, greed-fueled hijacking of this generation’s broadest and most far-reaching foreign-policy initiative, pushed America into previously unknown realms of moral insanity. When I contact Mark Atwood and ask him to explain how he could watch one of his best employees get blown up and crippled for life, and then cut him loose with debts totaling well over half a million dollars, Atwood, safe in his office in Kuwait City and contentedly suckling at the taxpayer teat, decides that answering this one question is just too much to ask of poor old him.

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~ by Jay on August 26, 2007.

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